Now Playing Tracks

interpretivescreaming:

anjakeister:

hecallsmepineappleprincess:

mickeymouseclub-disney:

muppetmayhem:

icantbelieveijoined:

trevorstmcgoodbody:

badtvblog:

Don’t watch this if you’re soaked in gasoline because it will warm your heart and you will burn to death and die.

image

THE END

Friendly reminder classic moments like these with the kids are entirely unscripted.

My heart melted

Jfc

lookitszee!!

I’m so glad I stopped to watch this

(Source: youtube.com)

cross-connect:

Shinichi Maruyama 
 Born in Nagano, Japan in 1968, Shinichi Maruyama hurls black India ink into water and photographs the millisecond that these two liquids collide. Capable of capturing this phenomenon at a 7,500th of a second, Maruyama takes full advantage of a recent advancement in strobe light technology which can record physical events faster than the naked eye can perceive them. In the series Kusho, which means “writing in the sky,” Maruyama’s goal is to arrest in space and time the sublime intersection of two different media before they merge into one. In some respects, the project resembles a scientific experiment, but in Maruyama’s artistic hands, the total action becomes a form of Shodo (Japanese calligraphy) performance—with the gesture executed in the air rather than on the flat surface of the paper. “Once your brush touches paper, you must finish the character, you have one chance. It can never be repeated or duplicated. You must commit your full attention and being to each stroke. Liquids, like ink, are elusive by nature. As sumi ink finds its own path through the paper grain, liquid finds its unique path as it moves through air.” -Shinichi Maruyama Txt Via MyModernMet
                                                     &&
Zoom Info
cross-connect:

Shinichi Maruyama 
 Born in Nagano, Japan in 1968, Shinichi Maruyama hurls black India ink into water and photographs the millisecond that these two liquids collide. Capable of capturing this phenomenon at a 7,500th of a second, Maruyama takes full advantage of a recent advancement in strobe light technology which can record physical events faster than the naked eye can perceive them. In the series Kusho, which means “writing in the sky,” Maruyama’s goal is to arrest in space and time the sublime intersection of two different media before they merge into one. In some respects, the project resembles a scientific experiment, but in Maruyama’s artistic hands, the total action becomes a form of Shodo (Japanese calligraphy) performance—with the gesture executed in the air rather than on the flat surface of the paper. “Once your brush touches paper, you must finish the character, you have one chance. It can never be repeated or duplicated. You must commit your full attention and being to each stroke. Liquids, like ink, are elusive by nature. As sumi ink finds its own path through the paper grain, liquid finds its unique path as it moves through air.” -Shinichi Maruyama Txt Via MyModernMet
                                                     &&
Zoom Info
cross-connect:

Shinichi Maruyama 
 Born in Nagano, Japan in 1968, Shinichi Maruyama hurls black India ink into water and photographs the millisecond that these two liquids collide. Capable of capturing this phenomenon at a 7,500th of a second, Maruyama takes full advantage of a recent advancement in strobe light technology which can record physical events faster than the naked eye can perceive them. In the series Kusho, which means “writing in the sky,” Maruyama’s goal is to arrest in space and time the sublime intersection of two different media before they merge into one. In some respects, the project resembles a scientific experiment, but in Maruyama’s artistic hands, the total action becomes a form of Shodo (Japanese calligraphy) performance—with the gesture executed in the air rather than on the flat surface of the paper. “Once your brush touches paper, you must finish the character, you have one chance. It can never be repeated or duplicated. You must commit your full attention and being to each stroke. Liquids, like ink, are elusive by nature. As sumi ink finds its own path through the paper grain, liquid finds its unique path as it moves through air.” -Shinichi Maruyama Txt Via MyModernMet
                                                     &&
Zoom Info
cross-connect:

Shinichi Maruyama 
 Born in Nagano, Japan in 1968, Shinichi Maruyama hurls black India ink into water and photographs the millisecond that these two liquids collide. Capable of capturing this phenomenon at a 7,500th of a second, Maruyama takes full advantage of a recent advancement in strobe light technology which can record physical events faster than the naked eye can perceive them. In the series Kusho, which means “writing in the sky,” Maruyama’s goal is to arrest in space and time the sublime intersection of two different media before they merge into one. In some respects, the project resembles a scientific experiment, but in Maruyama’s artistic hands, the total action becomes a form of Shodo (Japanese calligraphy) performance—with the gesture executed in the air rather than on the flat surface of the paper. “Once your brush touches paper, you must finish the character, you have one chance. It can never be repeated or duplicated. You must commit your full attention and being to each stroke. Liquids, like ink, are elusive by nature. As sumi ink finds its own path through the paper grain, liquid finds its unique path as it moves through air.” -Shinichi Maruyama Txt Via MyModernMet
                                                     &&
Zoom Info

cross-connect:

Shinichi Maruyama

 Born in Nagano, Japan in 1968, Shinichi Maruyama hurls black India ink into water and photographs the millisecond that these two liquids collide. Capable of capturing this phenomenon at a 7,500th of a second, Maruyama takes full advantage of a recent advancement in strobe light technology which can record physical events faster than the naked eye can perceive them. In the series Kusho, which means “writing in the sky,” Maruyama’s goal is to arrest in space and time the sublime intersection of two different media before they merge into one. In some respects, the project resembles a scientific experiment, but in Maruyama’s artistic hands, the total action becomes a form of Shodo (Japanese calligraphy) performance—with the gesture executed in the air rather than on the flat surface of the paper. “Once your brush touches paper, you must finish the character, you have one chance. It can never be repeated or duplicated. You must commit your full attention and being to each stroke. Liquids, like ink, are elusive by nature. As sumi ink finds its own path through the paper grain, liquid finds its unique path as it moves through air.” -Shinichi Maruyama Txt Via MyModernMet

                                                     &&

"I’m like a dog chasing cars. I wouldn’t know what to do if I actually caught one!" -The Joker

This is the way I feel about people I like sometimes, because it’s like “Ooooh you are pretty and smart and I want you!” But when they return the feeling Idk what to do because I don’t want sex, I mostly just wanna be around them sometimes. 

poldberg:

While there is a lot of appropriate rage about Ferguson right now, the killing of John Crawford, III is getting less attention than it deserves. I put Shaun King’s tweets and history lesson on the matter in chronological order for easier consumption.

Links:

Autopsy and video show John Crawford shot from behind in Wal-Mart

Witness in murder of John Crawford changes story

You really should be following Shaun King on Twitter.

petemaximoff:

just so you know what is going on in my country right now:

  • votes came in for independence 45% yes 55% no
  • media very “”no”” centred and bias
  • unionists are now attacking yes voters
  • a seventeen year old girl has been stabbed
  • they are burning our saltire giving nazi salutes
  • our first minister resigns

please signal boost this 

We make Tumblr themes